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Academic Regulations 2010-2011

registrar

University Registrar, Jeff von Munkwitz-Smith assists students at the Student Help Desk, Wilbur Cross Building.

 

By accepting admission, the student assumes responsibility for knowing and complying with the regulations and procedures set forth by the University.


University Requirements for all Baccalaureates

The Board of Trustees awards the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Engineering, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of General Studies to students who have completed the degree requirements of a school or college. Students can find their degree requirements in the section of the Catalog devoted to their school or college.

Required Credits. The University requires all students to complete at least 120 credits toward the degree. Some schools require more than 120 degree credits for graduation.

Required GPA. The University requires that all students have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 at the time of graduation. However, some of the schools and colleges require higher averages. Students should refer to their school or college requirements to determine the minimum cumulative GPA required.

Residence Requirement. The University requires that all students complete the last two semesters of their work at the University of Connecticut, but the school or college may require the student to complete more work at the University. Waivers require the permission of the department head, the academic dean and the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.

Credits earned "in residence" include all University of Connecticut credits, without regard to the campus or where the student lives. Whereas credits from other institutions may count toward the degree, graduating students must have earned at least 30 degree credits in residence.

Students may not take courses from other institutions during the last two semesters unless: 1) they have completed acceptable academic work in the armed services (the Transfer Admissions Office must receive the transcript within two years of the student's discharge); 2) in the judgment of the department head, academic dean and Provost, work at another institution will enrich their program; 3) personal reasons compel them to leave the University for all or part of the final year (they must have permission to take courses elsewhere from the department head, academic dean and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education).

Students wanting to transfer credits from another school in the final two years should discuss their plans with their advisor. They should note the residence requirements in their school or college and get permission in advance from any others who may be involved in the transfer.

General Education Requirements

The University Senate enacted these requirements to ensure that all University of Connecticut undergraduate students become articulate and acquire intellectual breadth and versatility, critical judgment, moral sensitivity, awareness of their era and society, consciousness of the diversity of human culture and experience, and a working understanding of the processes by which they can continue to acquire and use knowledge. It is vital to the accomplishment of the University's mission that a balance between professional and general education be established and maintained in which each is complementary to and compatible with the other.

*Every student must meet a set of core requirements to earn a baccalaureate degree, though some schools and colleges may add to the requirements listed here. To avoid delaying the progress of their degree, students should always consult the requirements listed for their particular school or college before registering. The school or college may refer the student to these Academic Regulations when the requirements and choices duplicate those listed here.

Content Areas

There are four Content Areas:

One - Arts and Humanities. Six credits.
Two - Social Sciences. Six credits.
Three - Science and Technology. Six to seven credits.
Four - Diversity and Multiculturalism. Six credits.

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Find open classes to fulfill Content Area requirements by using the new search feature. If you have a password, log in to the
Student Administration System
or simply enter as a Guest. For assistance, link to Self Service Directions.
Search by General Education Content Area by entering the exact code as displayed below including the space and period.
(Tip: Use the copy and paste function.) Or, search by any word in the Catalog course description such as introduction, economics,
statistics, India, etc.

CA 1.
CA 1. CA 4.
CA 1. CA 4-INT.
CA 2.
CA 2. CA 4.
CA 2. CA 4-INT.
CA 3.
CA3-LAB.
CA 4.
CA 4-INT.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The courses fulfilling the Content Areas One, Two and Three requirements must be drawn from at least six different subjects as designated by the subject letter code (e.g., ANTH or PVS). The courses within each of these content areas must be from two different subjects. Content area courses may be counted toward the major. **

Normally, the six credits required as a minimum for each Content Area will be met by two three-credit courses. However, in Content Area One, one-credit performance courses may be included. Students may use no more than three credits of such courses to meet the requirement.

In Content Area Three, one of the courses must be a laboratory course of four or more credits. However, this laboratory requirement is waived for students who have passed a hands-on laboratory science course in the biological and/or physical sciences.

In Content Area Four, at least three credits shall address issues of diversity and/or multiculturalism outside of the United States (International courses).

One, and only one, Content Area Four course may also serve as a Content Area One, Content Area Two, or Content Area Three requirement.

_______________________________________________

* Undergraduate students with Bachelor's degree from regionally accredited institutions are exempt from the University General Education Requirements but not the 2000-level and above W course within the major nor any additional general education requirements of a School/College.

** A student will be permitted to use two courses from the same department within Content Areas One through Three if one of those courses is cross-listed in another subject letter code not otherwise used to meet this requirement.

Each Content Area window below may be opened for list display and closed as needed.

Content Area 1

Arts and Humanities
Arts and Humanities courses provide a broad vision of artistic and humanist themes. These courses enable students themselves to study and understand the artistic, cultural and historical processes of humanity. They encourage students to explore their own traditions and their places within the larger world so that they, as informed citizens, may participate more fully in the rich diversity of human languages and cultures.

Links in course numbers connect to course descriptions. The user may close each category by Content Area bar.

AFAM/FINA 1100 Afrocentric Perspectives in the Arts
AMST 1700 Honors Core: American Landscapes
ANTH 1001W Anthropology through Film
ANTH 3401 World Religions 
ARAB 1121 Traditional Arab Literatures, Cultures, and Civilizations
ARAB 1122 Modern Arabic Culture
ART 1000 Art Appreciation
ARTH 1128 Introduction to Western Art II: The Renaissance to the Present, a World Perspective
ARTH 1137 Introduction to Art History I
ARTH 1138 Introduction to Art History II 
ARTH 1141 Introduction to Latin American Art
ARTH 1162 Introduction to Architecture
AASI 3201 Introduction to Asian American Studies
AASI/HIST 3531 Japanese Americans and World War II
CHIN 1121 Traditional Chinese Culture
CHIN 1122 Modern Chinese Culture
CAMS 1101 Greek Civilization
CAMS 1102 Roman Civilization
CAMS 1103 Classical Mythology
CLCS 1101 Classics of World Literature I
CLCS 1102 Classics of World Literature II
CLCS 1103W Languages and Cultures
CLCS 1110 Introduction to Film Studies
CLCS 2201 Intercultural Competency towards Global Perspectives
DRAM 1101 Introduction to the Theatre
DRAM 1110 Introduction to Film
ECON 2101/W Economic History of Europe
ECON 2102/W Economic History of the United States
ENGL 1101/W Classical and Medieval Western Literature 
ENGL 1103/W Renaissance and Modern Western Literature 
ENGL 1503 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 1616/W Major Works of English and American Literature
ENGL 1640W Literature and the Creative Process
ENGL 2100 British Literature I
ENGL 2101 British Literature II
ENGL 2274W Disability in American Literature and Culture
ENGL 2401 Poetry
ENGL 2405 Drama
ENGL 2407 The Short Story
ENGL 2408/W Modern Drama
ENGL 2409 The Modern Novel
ENGL 2411/W Popular Literature
ENGL 3629 Introduction to Holocaust Literature
FREN 1169 Studies in the French-Speaking World
FREN 1171 French Cinema
FREN 1176 Literatures and Cultures of the Postcolonial Francophone World
FREN 1177 Magicians, Witches, Wizards: Parallel Beliefs and Popular Culture in France
FREN 3210 French Art and Civilization
FREN 3211 Contemporary France
FREN 3218 Francophone Studies
FREN 3224 Issues in Cultural Studies, the Media, and the Social Sciences
FREN 3230 The Middle Ages: Myths and Legends
FREN 3234 Romanticism, Realism, Fin de Siecle: 19th-Century Literature
FREN 3235 French Modernity
FREN 3261W From the Holy Grail to the Revolution: Introduction to Literature
FREN 3262W From the Romantics to the Moderns: Introduction to Literature
FREN 3267/W Grammar and Culture
FREN 3268/W Grammar and Composition
FREN 3270W French Literature and Civilization in English
GEOG/URBN 1200 The City in the Western Tradition 
GERM 1140W German Literature in English
GERM 1169 Contemporary Germany in Europe
GERM 1171 The German Film
GERM 1175 Human Rights and German Culture
GERM 3251 German Culture and Civilization
GERM 3252W Studies in Early German Literature
GERM 3253W Studies in German Literature Around 1800
GERM 3254W Studies in 19th Century German Literature
GERM 3255/W Studies in 20th Century German Literature
GERM 3258 Germans in Africa, Blacks in German-Speaking Countries. Colonial and Postcolonial Perspectives
GERM 3261W German Film and Culture
GERM 3264W German Cinema in Cross-Cultural Perspective
HEB/JUDS 1103 Literature and Civilization of the Jewish People
HIST 1100/W The Historian as Detective
HIST 1201 Modern World History
HIST 1203/ WS 1121 Women in History
HIST 1206 Living through War in World History since 1500
HIST 1300 Western Traditions Before 1500
HIST 1400 Modern Western Traditions
HIST 1501/W United States History to 1877
HIST 1502/W United States History Since 1877
HIST/LAMS/PRLS 1570 Migrant Workers in Connecticut
HIST 1800 The Roots of Traditional Asia 
HIST 1805 East Asian History Through Hanzi Characters
HIST/SCI 2206 History of Science
HIST 2401/W Europe in the 19th Century
HIST 2402/W Europe in the 20th Century
HIST/LAMS 3609 Latin America in the National Period
HIST/LAMS 3635 Mexico in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
HIST/LAMS/PRLS 3660W History of Migration in Las Americas
HIST 3674/PRLS 3220 History of Latino/as in the United States
HIST 3705 The Modern Middle East from 1700 to the Present
HRTS/PHIL 2170W Bioethics and Human Rights in Cross-Cultural Perspective
INTD 3260 The Bible
ILCS 1101  The Italian Renaissance
ILCS 1149 Cinema and Society in Contemporary Italy
ILCS 1158 Italian American Experience in Literature and Film
ILCS 1160 Culture of Fascist Italy
ILCS 1170 Introducing Italy through Its Regions
ILCS 3255W Dante's Divine Comedy in English Translation
ILCS 3258/W Cinematic Representations of Italian Americans
ILCS 3260W Italian Cinema
LAND 2210 The Common (Shared) Landscape of the USA: Rights, Responsibilities and Values
LING 1010 Language and Mind
MAST 1200 Introduction to Maritime Culture
MUSI 1001 Music Appreciation
MUSI 1002 Sing and Shout! The History of America in Song
MUSI 1003 Popular Music and Diversity in American Society
MUSI 1004 Non-Western Music
MUSI 1005 Honors Core: Music and Nature, Music and the Environment
MUSI 1021 Introduction to Music History I
MUSI 1022 Introduction to Music History II
MUSI 1112 University Symphony Orchestra (this course has fewer than 3 credits)
NRE 1235 Environmental Conservation
PHIL 1101 Problems of Philosophy
PHIL 1102 Philosophy and Logic
PHIL 1103 Philosophical Classics
PHIL 1104 Philosophy and Social Ethics
PHIL 1105/W Philosophy and Religion
PHIL 1106 Non-Western and Comparative Philosophy
PHIL 1107 Philosophy and Gender
PHIL 1165W Philosophy and Literature
PHIL 1175 Ethical Issues in Health Care
PHIL 3220 Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights
POLS 1002 Introduction to Political Theory
PRLS/SPAN 1009 Latino Literature, Culture, and Society
SPAN 1007 Major Works of Hispanic Literature in Translation
SPAN 1008 Christians, Muslims and Jews in Medieval Spain
SPAN 1010 Contemporary Spanish Culture and Society through Film
SPAN 3232 Literature of Crisis in Modern Spain 
SPAN 3250 Film in Spain and Latin America
WS 1104 Feminisms and the Arts
Content Area 2

Social Sciences
The social sciences examine how individuals, groups, institutions, and societies behave and influence one another and the natural environment. Courses in this group enable students to analyze and understand interactions of the numerous social factors that influence behavior at the individual, cultural, societal, national, or international level. They use the methods and theories of social science inquiry to develop critical thought about current social issues and problems.

Links in course numbers connect to course descriptions.

AFAM/ANTH 3152 Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
ARE 1110 Population, Food and the Environment
ARE 1150 Principles of Agricultural and Resource Economics
ANTH 1000/W Other People's Worlds
ANTH 1006 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 1500 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
ANTH 2000/W Social Anthropology
COMM 1000 The Process of Communication
CDIS 1150 Introduction to Communication Disorders
ECON 1000 Essentials of Economics
ECON 1107 Honors Core: Economies, Nature, and the Environment
ECON 1108 Game Theory in the Natural and Social Sciences
ECON 1179 Economic Growth and the Environment
ECON 1200 Principles of Economics
ECON 1201 Principles of Microeconomics
ECON 1202 Principles of Macroeconomics
GEOG 1000 Introduction to Geography 
GEOG 1100 Globalization
GEOG 1700 World Regional Geography
GEOG 2100 Economic Geography
HDFS 1060 Close Relationships Across the Lifespan
HDFS 1070 Individual and Family Development
HRTS/POLS 1007 Introduction to Human Rights
INTD 1500 Alcohol and Drugs on Campus: Exploring the College Culture
LAMS 1190/W Perspectives on Latin America
LING 1020 Language and Environment 
LING 1030 The Diversity of Languages
LING 2850 Introduction to Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community
LING 3610W Language and Culture
POLS 1202/W Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 1207 Introduction to Non-Western Politics
POLS 1402/W Introduction to International Relations
POLS 1602/W Introduction to American Politics
POLS 3208/W Politics of Oil
POLS 3237/W Democratic Culture and Citizenship in Latin America
POLS 3615/W Electoral Realignment
PSYC 1101 General Psychology II
PSYC 1103 General Psychology II (Enhanced)
PP 1001 Introduction to Public Policy
SOCI 1001/W Introduction to Sociology 
SOCI 1251/W Social Problems 
SOCI 1501/W Race, Class and Gender
SOCI 3823 The Sociology of Law: Global and Comparative
URBN 1300W Exploring Your Community
WS 1105 Gender in Everyday Life
WS 1124 Gender in Global Perspective
WS 3253/W Gender Representations in U.S. Popular Culture

 

Content Area 3

Science and Technology

These courses acquaint students with scientific thought, observation, experimentation, and formal hypothesis testing, and enable students to consider the impact that developments in science and technology have on the nature and quality of life. Knowledge of the basic vocabulary of science and technology is a prerequisite for informed assessments of the physical universe and of technological developments.

Links in course numbers connect to course descriptions.

AH/NUSC 1030 Interdisciplinary Approach to Obesity Prevention
ANSC/NUSC 1645 The Science of Food
BME/CSE/MCB 1401 Honors Core: Computational Molecular Biology
CHEM 1101 Chemistry for an Informed Electorate
COGS 2201 Foundations of Cognitive Science
EEB 2202 Evolution and Human Diversity
ECE 1001 A Survey of Modern Electronic Technology 
ENGR 1101 Living in an Engineered World
GEOG/GSCI 1070 Global Change and Natural Disasters
GEOG 2300 Introduction to Physical Geography
GSCI 1010 Age of the Dinosaurs
GSCI 1051 Earth and Life through Time (Students who complete both GEOL 1051 and 1052 may request
GEOL 1051 be converted from a CA 3 Non-laboratory to a CA 3 Laboratory course.)
LING 2010Q The Science of Linguistics
MARN 1001 The Sea Around Us
MARN 1002 Introduction to Oceanography
MATH 1050Q Mathematical Modeling in the Environment
MCB 1405 Honors Core: The Genetics Revolution in Contemporary Culture
NRE 1000 Environmental Science
NUSC 1165 Fundamentals of Nutrition
PHAR 1000 Drugs: Actions and Impact on Health and Society
PHAR 1001 Toxic Chemicals and Health
PHYS 1020Q Introductory Astronomy
PHYS 1030Q Physics of the Environment
PLSC 1150 Agricultural Technology and Society 
PSYC 1100 General Psychology I
SCI 1051 Geoscience through American Studies

 

Content Area 3

Laboratory Courses

These courses acquaint students with scientific thought, observation, experimentation, and formal hypothesis testing, and enable students to consider the impact that developments in science and technology have on the nature and quality of life. Knowledge of the basic vocabulary of science and technology is a prerequisite for informed assessments of the physical universe and of technological developments.

Links through the course numbers connect to course descriptions.

BIOL 1102 Foundations of Biology 
BIOL 1103 The Biology of Human Health and Disease
BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology
BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology
BIOL 1110 Introduction to Botany
CHEM 1122 Chemical Principles and Applications
CHEM 1124Q Fundamentals of General Chemistry I 
CHEM 1127Q General Chemistry
CHEM 1128Q General Chemistry
CHEM 1137Q Enhanced General Chemistry
CHEM 1138Q Enhanced General Chemistry
CHEM 1147Q Honors General Chemistry
CHEM 1148Q Honors General Chemistry
GEOG 1302 GIS Modeling of Environmental Change
GSCI 1050 Earth and Life through Time with Laboratory (Students who complete both GEOL 1051 and
1052 may request GEOL 1051 be converted from a CA 3 Non-laboratory to a CA 3 Laboratory course.)
MARN 1003 Introduction to Oceanography with Laboratory
PHYS 1010Q Elements of Physics
PHYS 1025Q Introductory Astronomy with Laboratory
PHYS 1035Q Physics of the Environment with Laboratory
PHYS 1075Q Physics of Music 
PHYS 1201Q General Physics
PHYS 1202Q General Physics
PHYS 1401Q General Physics with Calculus
PHYS 1402Q General Physics with Calculus
PHYS 1501Q Physics for Engineers I 
PHYS 1502Q Physics for Engineers II 
PHYS 1600Q Introduction to Modern Physics
PHYS 1601Q Fundamentals of Physics I 
PHYS 1602Q Fundamentals of Physics II
Content Area 4

Diversity and Multiculturalism

In this interconnected global community, individuals of any profession need to be able to understand, appreciate, and function in cultures other than their own. Diversity and multiculturalism in the university curriculum contribute to this essential aspect of education by bringing to the fore the historical truths about different cultural perspectives, especially those of groups that traditionally have been under-represented. These groups might be characterized by such features as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identities, political systems, or religious traditions, or by persons with disabilities. By studying the ideas, history, values, and creative expressions of diverse groups, students gain appreciation for differences as well as commonalities among people.

Links in course numbers connect to course descriptions.

AFAM/FINA 1100 Afrocentric Perspectives in the Arts
AFAM/PSYC 3106/W Black Psychology
AFAM/DRAM 3131/W African-American Theatre
AFAM/ANTH 3152 Race, Ethnicity, Nationalism
AFAM/ENGL 3214W Black American Writers I
AFAM/HRTS/SOCI 3505 White Racism
AFAM/POLS 3642 African-American Politics
AMST 1201/ENGL 1201/HIST 1503 Introduction to American Studies
ANTH 2000/W Social Anthropology
ANTH 3150/W Migration
ANTH 3202W Illness and Caring
ANTH 3902 North American Prehistory
ANTH 3904/W Ethnohistory of Native New England
AASI 3201 Introduction to Asian American Studies
AASI/ENGL 3212 Asian American Literature
AASI 3215 Critical Health Issues of Asian Americans
AASI 3221/HRTS 3571/SOCI 3221  Sociological Perspectives on Asian American Women
AASI/HIST 3531 Japanese Americans and World War II
COMM 3321/PRLS 3264/WS 3260 Latinas and Media
CDIS 1150 Introduction to Communication Disorders
DRAM 3130 Women in Theatre 
ENGL 1601W Race, Gender, and the Culture Industry
ENGL 2274W Disability in American Literature and Culture
ENGL 3210 Native American Literature
ENGL 3214/W Black American Writers I
ENGL 3218/W Ethnic Literatures of the United States
ENGL 3605/PRLS 3232 Latina/o Literature
ENGL 3609 Women in Literature
ENGL 3613 Introduction to LGBT Literature
HEB/JUDS 1103 Literature and Civilization of the Jewish People
HIST 1203/WS 1121 Women in History
HIST/LAMS/PRLS 1570 Migrant Workers in Connecticut
HIST 3204/W Science and Social Issues In the Modern World
HIST 3570 American Indian History
HIST/LAMS/PRLS 3660W History of Migration in Las Américas
HIST 3674/PRLS 3220 History of Latinos/as in the United States
HDFS 2001 Diversity Issues in Human Development and Family Studies
HDFS 3261 Men and Masculinity: A Social Psychological Perspective
INTD 2245 Introduction to Diversity Studies in American Culture
INTD 3584 Seminar in Urban Problems 
ILCS 1158 Italian American Experience in Literature and Film
ILCS 3258/W Cinematic Representations of Italian Americans
LING 1030 The Diversity of Languages
LING 2850 Introduction to Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community
MUSI 1002 Sing and Shout! The History of America in Song
MUSI 1003 Popular Music and Diversity in American Society
NURS 1175W End of Life: A Multicultural Experience
PHIL 1107 Philosophy and Gender
POLS 3662/PRLS 3270 Latino Political Behavior
PSYC 2101 Introduction to Multicultural Psychology
PSYC 2701 Social Psychology of Multiculturalism
PSYC/WS 3102/W Psychology of Women
PRLS/SPAN 1009 Latino Literature, Culture, and Society
PRLS 3210 Contemporary Issues in Latino Studies
SOCI 1501/W Race, Class and Gender
SOCI 2501/W Sociology of Intolerancs and Justice
SOCI/WS 3621/W Sociology of Sexualities
URBN 1300W Exploring Your Community
WS 1104 Feminisms and the Arts 
WS 1105 Gender in Everyday Life

 

Content Area 4

International

In this interconnected global community, individuals of any profession need to be able to understand, appreciate, and function in cultures other than their own. Diversity and multiculturalism in the university curriculum contribute to this essential aspect of education by bringing to the fore the historical truths about different cultural perspectives, especially those of groups that traditionally have been under-represented. These groups might be characterized by such features as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identities, political systems, or religious traditions, or by persons with disabilities. By studying the ideas, history, values, and creative expressions of diverse groups, students gain appreciation for differences as well as commonalities among people.

.Links in course numbers connect to course descriptions.

ANTH 1000/W Other People's Worlds
ANTH 1001W Anthropology through Film
ANTH 1006 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 1500 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
ANTH/HRTS 3028 Indigenous Rights and Aboriginal Australia
ANTH 3030 Peoples of the Pacific Islands
ANTH/HRTS 3153W Human Rights in Democratizing Countries
ANTH 3401 World Religions
ANTH 3504 New World Prehistory
ARAB 1121 Traditional Arab Literatures, Cultures, and Civilizations
ARAB 1122 Modern Arabic Culture
ART/AASI/INDS 3375 Indian Art and Popular Culture: Independence to the Present
ARTH 1128 Introduction to Western Art II: The Renaissance to the Present, a World Perspective
ARTH 1141 Introduction to Latin American Art
AASI 3216 Asian Medical Systems
CHIN 1121 Traditional Chinese Culture
CHIN 1122 Modern Chinese Culture
CLCS 1101 Classics of World Literature I
CLCS 1102 Classics of World Literature II
CLCS 1103W Languages and Cultures
CLCS 2201 International Competency towards Global Perspectives
EEB 2202 Evolution and Human Diversity
EEB 3307/NRE 3305 African Field Ecology and Renewable Resources Management
ECON 2104/W Economic History of the Middle East 
ENGL 1301 Major Works of Eastern Literature
ENGL 2301/W World Literature in English 
ENGL 3120 Early and Modern Irish Literature
ENGL 3122 Contemporary Irish Literature
ENGL 3318 Literature and Culture of the Third World
ENGL 3320 Literature and Culture of India
FREN 1169 Studies in the French-Speaking World
FREN 1171 French Cinema
FREN 1176 Literatures and Cultures of the Postcolonial Francophone World
FREN 1177 Magicians, Witches, Wizards: Parallel Beliefs and Popular Culture in France
FREN 3211 Contemporary France
FREN 3218 Francophone Studies
FREN 3224 Issues in Cultural Studies, the Media, and the Social Sciences
GEOG 1100 Globalization
GEOG 1700 World Regional Geography
GERM 1169 Contemporary Germany in Europe
GERM 1171 The German Film
GERM 1175 Human Rights and German Culture
GERM 3251 German Culture and Civilization
GERM 3258 Germans in Africa, Blacks in German-Speaking Countries. Colonial and Postcolonial Perspective
GERM 3261W German Film and Culture
HIST 1206 Living through War in History since 1500
HIST 1800 The Roots of Traditional Asia
HIST 1805 East Asian History Through Hanzi Characters
HIST/LAMS 3609 Latin America in the National Period
HIST/LAMS 3635 Mexico in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
HIST 3705 The Modern Middle East from 1700 to the Present
HRTS/POLS 1007 Introduction to Human Rights
INTD 1660W Ports of Passage
ILCS 1149 Cinema and Society in Contemporary Italy
ILCS 1160 Culture of Fascist Italy
ILCS 3260W Italian Cinema
LAMS 1190/W Perspectives on Latin America
LING 1020 Language and Environment
LING 3610W Language and Culture
MUSI 1004 Non-Western Music
MUSI 3421W Music in World Cultures
NUSC 1167 Food, Culture and Society
PHIL 1106 Non-Western and Comparative Philosophy
PLSC 1125 Insects, Food and Culture
POLS 1202/W Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 1207 Introduction to Non-Western Politics 
POLS 1402/W Introduction to International Relations
POLS 3472/W South Asia in World Politics
PSYC 3402W Child Development in Sociopolitical Context
SOCI 2509/W Sociology of Anti-Semitism
SOCI 3823 The Sociology of Law: Global and Comparative
SPAN 1007 Major Works of Hispanic Literature in Translation
SPAN 1008 Christians, Muslims and Jews in Medieval Spain
SPAN 1010 Contemporary Spanish Culture and Society through Film
SPAN 3250 Film in Spain and Latin America
WS 1124 Gender in Global Perspective
WS 2105 Gender and Science
WS 2255/W Sexualities, Activism and Globalization
WS 3255W Sexual Citizenship


Competencies

University of Connecticut undergraduates need to demonstrate competency in five fundamental areas - computer technology, information literacy, quantitative skills, second language proficiency and writing. The development of these competencies involves two parts: one establishing entry-level expectations and the second establishing graduation expectations. The entry-level expectations apply to all incoming students. The exit expectations may vary for different major fields of study.

Computer Technology Competency

Entering students are expected to have the basic computer technology skills required to begin university study. Students should take online assessments of knowledge and competency and utilize available workshops/online tutorials to make up any gaps. Each major has established expectations for the computer technology competencies of its graduates and built the development of these into the major curriculum. Further details are given under the description of each major elsewhere in this catalog.

Information Literacy Competency

Information literacy involves a general understanding of how information is created, disseminated and organized, and an ability to access, evaluate, synthesize and incorporate information into written, oral, or media presentations. Basic information literacy is taught to all freshmen as an integral part of ENGL 1010/1011, in collaboration with the staff of the University Libraries. Each major program has considered the information literacy competencies required of its graduates and built those expectations into the upper-level research and writing requirements in the major. Further details are given under the description of each major elsewhere in this catalog.

Quantitative (Q) Competency

All students must pass two Q courses, which may also satisfy Content Area requirements. One Q course must be from Mathematics or Statistics. Students should discuss with their advisor how best to satisfy these requirements based on their background, prior course preparation and career aspirations. Students whose high school algebra needs strengthening should be encouraged to complete MATH 1011Q: Introductory College Algebra and Mathematical Modeling , as preparation for other Q courses. Alternatively, students may take MATH 1010: Basic Algebra with Applications (a course that does not carry credit toward graduation.) To receive credit for MATH 1011Q, it must be taken before successful completion of another Q course. In some cases, advisors may recommend postponing registration in a Q course until after the student has completed a semester of course work at the University.

Second Language Competency

A student meets the minimum requirement if admitted to the University with three years of a single foreign language in high school, or the equivalent. When the years of study have been split between high school and earlier grades, the requirement is met if the student has successfully completed the third-year high school level course. With anything less than that, the student must pass the second semester course in the first year sequence of college level study in a single language.

Writing (W) Competency

All students must take either ENGL 1010 or 1011. Students passing ENGL 3800 are considered to have met the ENGL 1010 or 1011 requirement. Additionally, all students must take two writing-intensive (W) courses, which may also satisfy Content Area requirements. One of these must be at the 2000-level and associated with the student's major. Approved courses for each major are listed in their sections of this catalog. (Note: ENGL 1010 or 1011 is a prerequisite to all writing-intensive courses.)

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

Time Limit. All students wishing to apply toward a degree the credits earned more than eight years before graduation must have permission from the dean of the school or college concerned. The permission, if granted, applies only to the current school or college.

Applicability of Requirements. Students graduating from a school or college must meet the requirements as they were at the time the student entered, or as they were at any subsequent time. Candidates who transfer from a school or college and then return must meet the requirements as they were at the time the student returned, or as they were at any subsequent time. Students who withdraw (except those on official leave of absence) or are dismissed from the University and later return must meet the requirements as they were at the time the student returned, or as they were at any subsequent time.

Exemptions from, and Substitutions for, University Requirements. Students seeking an exemption from a University requirement, or wishing to substitute another course for the course prescribed, should consult their academic dean. To effect a change, the dean must recommend the change, and the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education must approve it. Transfer students wanting exemptions or substitutions should request them of their academic dean as they enroll.

Graduation

Tentative and Final Plans of Study. Except for students in the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, all students must consult with their advisors in completing a tentative Plan of Study form. The Plan of Study describes how the student intends to satisfy the requirements for the degree. Students should get the form from the dean of their school or college, consult with their advisor and file the completed form with their major department. Students should file the tentative Plan of Study as soon as possible.

Students must submit a final Plan of Study form during the first four weeks of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. The major advisor and the department head must sign the form before the Registrar receives it. The signatures indicate that the advisor and department head believe that the program meets degree requirements. The student's program is still subject to audit by the degree auditor to insure the student has met all requirements. The degree auditor will notify the student if a problem is discovered with the final Plan of Study.

Application for Degrees. To graduate, candidates must apply to graduate by the due dates specified by the Office of the Registrar. Candidates apply through the Student Administration System. Additional information pertinent to graduation is available through the Steps to a Successful Graduation website: http://web.uconn.edu/registraroffice/graduati.html. This application is essential for graduation. Candidates failing to file the application on time may not: (1) be granted a degree on the date expected even though they fulfilled all other requirements for the degree, (2) have their names printed in the Commencement Program, (3) have their names listed in hometown newspapers, as graduating, (4) receive information about and tickets for the Commencement ceremony.

graduates

Conferring of Degrees. The Board of Trustees awards degrees only to students in good standing who have met their obligations to the University. Students who do not complete requirements for the degree by one conferral date may qualify for the next conferral date by satisfactorily completing all graduation requirements.

The Board of Trustees confers degrees three times annually: Commencement Day in May, August 24 and the Sunday following final exams in December. Candidates meeting the requirements before the conferral date and needing verification may ask for a "Completion Letter" from the Office of the Registrar.

General Graduation Honors. Graduating seniors are eligible for cum laude designations on diplomas and transcripts if their complete academic records show at least 54 calculable credits at the University and meet the following criteria:

  • cum laude: at least a 3.0 total GPA (grade point average) and a class rank in the 75th percentile or above in the student's school or college.
  • magna cum laude: at least a 3.4 total GPA (grade point average) and a class rank in the 85th percentile or above in the student's school or college.
  • summa cum laude: at least a 3.7 total GPA (grade point average) and a class rank in the 95th percentile or above in the student's school or college.

General graduation honors for students meeting requirements at the conclusion of the summer sessions or the fall semester will be based on the grade point average cut-off points used for the previous spring semester to establish class rank in each school or college.

Commencement. The University has one commencement in May each year, following the Spring semester. Students who received degrees at the end of the previous summer or Fall semester and students who anticipate completing degree requirements by the May commencement or the following August may participate.

Diplomas. Students do not receive their diplomas at Commencement. The Registrar mails them to graduates by the third month after conferral. Diplomas may be withheld if financial or other obligations to the University remain unmet. Graduates who have not received their diploma by the end of the periods noted above should inform the Office of the Registrar.

Minors. A minor is available only to a matriculated student currently pursuing a baccalaureate degree. While not required for graduation, a minor provides an option for the student who wants an academic focus in addition to a major. Completion of a minor requires that a student earn a C (2.0) grade or better in each of the required courses for that minor. The same course may be used to meet both major and minor course requirements unless specifically stated otherwise in a major or minor. Substitutions are not possible for required courses in a minor. A plan of study for the minor; signed by the department or program head, director, or faculty designee; must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar during the first four weeks of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. All available minors are listed in the "Academic Degree Programs" section and described in the "Minors" section of this Catalog.

Additional Degree. Students may pursue an additional baccalaureate, either wholly or partly, concurrently or after receiving another degree. The student must complete an Additional Degree Petition, which requires the consent signature of the dean of each school or college in which the student will be enrolled. Students may get Additional Degree Petitions from the offices of deans or from the Registrar.

The student must meet all requirements for each degree. The two degrees require at least 30 degree credits more than the degree with the higher minimum-credit requirement. For example, Engineering degrees require at least 126 credits while Arts and Sciences degrees require at least 120 credits. The Engineering degree has the higher minimum-credit requirement, so the total is 126 + 30, or 156. (If the student pursues a third degree, the two additional degrees require at least 60 degree credits more than the degree with the highest minimum-credit requirement.) At least 30 of the additional credits must be 2000-level courses, or above, in the additional degree major or closely related fields and must be completed with a grade point average of at least 2.0. The requirement of 30 additional credits is waived for students who complete the requirements of both a teacher preparation degree in the Neag School of Education and a bachelor's degree in another school or college.

Some schools and colleges offer double majors. The Additional Degree should not be confused with a double major.

Course Information

Course Numbers

Course numbers show the level of the material presented. The University's course numbering system changed with the 2008-2009 Catalog. The numbers and the academic levels follow:

  • 0000-0999 courses in the Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture, may not be taken for degree credit by Baccalaureate students.
  • 1000-1999 introductory courses, usually with no prerequisites, primarily intended for Freshmen and Sophomores.
  • 2000-2999 courses, usually with no more than one prerequisite, primarily intended for Sophomores.
  • 3000-3999 advanced undergraduate courses primarily intended for Juniors and Seniors.
  • 4000-4999 advanced undergraduate courses primarily intended for Seniors.
  • 5000-5999 entry-level and intermediate Graduate courses.
  • 6000-6999 advanced Graduate courses.
  • 7000-7999 Law School courses.

Unless their school or college has more stringent requirements, undergraduate seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 2.6 or above may take 5000-level courses. Other undergraduates must have the permission of the instructor and the student's academic dean to enroll in a 5000-level course.

Consent Courses. Many University courses require consent of the instructor for enrollment. The course directory section of this Catalog specifies the required signatures.

Prerequisites and Corequisites: The term prerequisite implies a progression from less advanced to more advanced study in a field. Students must satisfy the prerequisite(s) before registering for the course, unless exempted by the instructor. Corequisite courses must be taken concurrently. When a course is listed as both a prerequisite and a corequisite, it may be taken prior to or concurrently with the other course.

Prerequisites taken out of sequence within a single department shall not count towards degree credit unless the head of the department offering the course grants an exception. For example, assume that courses A and B are in the same department and A is prerequisite to B. If the instructor permits the student to take B without having taken A, and the student passes B, the student may not take A for credit without permission. The student seeking credit for A must have the permission of the head of the department offering the course. The department head must notify the Registrar in writing.

Recommended Preparation.Denotes that the instructor will assume that students know material covered in the course(s) listed. Students who register for a course without the recommended background may experience difficulties and are encouraged to consult with the instructor prior to registration.

Restricted Credits. Students should read carefully the course descriptions in the Catalog before they register because some of the course credits may not count toward graduation. Some examples of credit-restricted courses are:

Students who have had three or more years of a foreign language in high school cannot receive credit for the elementary language courses in that same language. However, transfer students who were placed in an elementary language course through a proficiency exam at another institution of higher learning may contact the Modern and Classical Languages Department Head about permission to receive credit for the elementary language courses.

Course restrictions also apply to independent study courses (see Independent study, special topics, and variable topics courses), repeated courses (see Repeating courses), and prerequisites taken out of sequence (see Prerequisites).

In credit-restricted courses, the earned credits are reduced on the transcript. However, full credit will be used in the determination of full-time status and in the calculation of grade point averages.

Satisfying Course Requirements by Examination. A student may, with the permission of their academic dean, meet school or college course requirements by examination. The student earns no credit. The department offering the course gives the examination.

Earning Course Credits by Examination. The student should obtain a Petition for Course Credit by Examination from the Office of the Registrar, pay the Credit by Examination fee at the Bursar's Office, and take the form to the instructor of the course and the department head for review of the student's academic qualifications and approval to take the exam. The student must then take the form to the student's academic dean for final approval. When all approvals have been obtained, the student must take the form to the academic department to arrange for the examination.

When acceptable candidates apply, departments arrange examinations once a semester, as shown in the University calendar. The course instructor prepares and grades the examination. The student writes the answers unless the material makes an oral or performance examination more appropriate. Examinations in laboratory courses test the student's mastery of laboratory techniques. Students may not elect the Pass/Fail option when taking an examination for course credit. Posted grades are from A to D- with the corresponding grade points, and if the student fails the examination, the Registrar does not record a grade. If the department permits, students may review past examinations.

Students may not take an examination for credit if they previously covered a substantial portion of the material in a high-school or college course for which the University granted credit.

Students may not earn credits by examination for any course they have failed, by examination or otherwise.

Students may not earn credits by examination for ENGL 1003, 1004, or for 1000-level foreign language courses.  Schools and Colleges may exclude other courses from course credit by examination.

Students may not earn by examination more than one-fourth of the credits required for the degree.

College Board AP Examination Transfer Guidelines

AP Exam 
Score
UConn Course
Equivalent Granted
 
Credits
Granted

Art
     Drawing
     2-D Design
     3-D Design


4,5
4,5
4,5


ART/Studio 1000-level
ART/Studio 1000-level
ART/Studio 1000-level


3
3
3

Art History 
4, 5 
6
Biology 
4, 5 
8
Chemistry 
4, 5 
8
Chinese Language and Culture
4, 5 
4
Computer Science 
4, 5 
CSE 1000-level
3

Economics

Macroeconomics
Microeconomics


4, 5 
4, 5


3
3
English Language or English Literature
4, 5 
4
Environmental Science 
4, 5
3
French Language
French Literature
4, 5
4, 5
3
3
Human Geography
4, 5
3
German Language

Placement into 2000-level course
GERM 3233
No credit
3
Comparative Government & Politics
4,5
3
U.S. Government & Politics
4,5
3
American History 
4, 5 
3
European History 
4,5 
3
World History
4,5
3
Italian Language and Culture
4,5
3
Latin Literature
4, 5
CAMS 2000-level
3
Latin - Vergil
4,5
CAMS 2000-level
3
Math AB
Math BC
Math BC
4, 5 
 3 
 4, 5
4
4
8
Music 
4, 5
3
Physics B*
Physics C Elec & Magnet*
Physics C Mechanics*
4, 5 
4, 5 
4, 5
8
4
4
Psychology 
4, 5 
PSYC 1000 level
3
Spanish Language
Spanish Literature
4, 5
4, 5
SPAN 3178
Spanish Literature 2000-level
3
3
Statistics
4,5
Statistics Q 1000-level
3

* Students earning a score of 4 in Physics B or Physics C must consult with a designated member to determine if credit will be allowed.

Advanced Placement. Various academic deans have approved Advanced Placement Examinations as a basis for granting advanced standing to students at the time of admission. The department teaching the subject matter covered by the test determines whether the student (1) receives full credit for a specific course, or (2) may use a specific course in meeting prerequisite requirements for more advanced courses or in fulfilling course requirements for graduation, or (3) neither of the preceding alternatives. See College Board AP Examination Transfer Guidelines above.

Registration

All students must register on the dates announced and pay the succeeding semester fee bills as due. Failure to pay by the payment deadlines may result in sanctions, including but not limited to cancellation of courses and removal from residence halls. Before registering, students must consult their academic advisors.

Students may take courses at any campus: Avery Point, Greater Hartford, Stamford, Storrs, Torrington and Waterbury . However, students must be registered for the majority of their credits at their home campus. The home campus is the campus to which the student was admitted unless an authorized campus change has taken place.

Immunization Requirement. The University Division of Health Services sends health report forms to entering students. Their physicians must sign these forms signifying that the student is free from active tuberculosis and immunized against rubella and measles. Students must complete the forms and return them directly to the University Health Services before registering.

Placement Testing. Depending on the student's preparation and course of study, some schools and colleges require entering students to take tests in mathematics, foreign languages and English.

Full-Time and Part-Time Registration. Full-time students register for at least 12 credits and continue to carry at least 12 credits through the end of the semester or the summer term.

Courses with restricted credits (see Credit Restrictions) have all credits counted in computing the Semester Credit Load, but only unrestricted credits count toward the degree. Unresolved marks from a previous semester and/or courses currently being audited are not counted in computing the Semester Credit Load.

Part-time students are those enrolled for fewer than 12 credits. Enrolling for fewer than 12 credits requires the written approval of the student's academic dean. Part-time students must have the permission of the Dean of Students to participate in any extra-curricular activity involving intercollegiate competition. Students considering taking fewer than 12 credits should consult their advisor and read carefully the rules governing scholastic probation and dismissal, financial aid and housing. They also should ask if their part-time status will affect their social security, their insurance and related matters.

Adding or Dropping Courses. Registration information can be found on the website of the Office of the Registrar at http://www.registrar.uconn.edu. Students must consult with their academic advisor prior to adding or dropping courses.

A student may add and drop courses from the time that registration opens through the second week of the semester without special permission. Courses dropped during this period are not recorded on the student's record.

During the third and fourth weeks of the semester, a student may add courses through the Office of the Registrar with consent of the student's course instructor, advisor, and the head of the department offering the course. After the fourth week of the semester, the permission of the student's dean is also required.

If a student drops a course after the second week of the semester, a "W" for withdrawal is recorded on the transcript. From the third through the ninth week of the semester, a student must obtain the advisor's signature to drop one course. To drop more than one course during that period, a student must obtain both the advisor's and the dean's signature.

To drop a course after the ninth week, the student needs the advisor's recommendation and the permission of the dean of his or her school or college. The dean only grants permission to drop a course after the ninth week for extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control. Exceptions are not made for the student's poor academic performance.

Section Changes. Section changes require the same authorization as other add/drop transactions.

Undergraduate Schedule Revision Regulations - Adding Classes
Semester Period
Add
First and Second Weeks of Classes
Registration
Third and Fourth Weeks of Classes
Advisor, Instructor, and Department Head offering Course
After the Fourth Week
All of the above and Dean
Undergraduate Schedule Revision Regulations - Dropping Classes
Semester Period
Single Drop
Two or More Drops
First and Second Weeks of Classes
* Registration with NO "W" Grade
* Registration with NO "W" Grade
Third through Ninth Weeks of Classes
Advisor with "W" Grade
Advisor and Dean with "W" Grade
After the Ninth Week
DEAN 
Exceptions made only for extenuating circumstances

*Students should be aware of the rules of their individual schools and colleges for using the Registration System.

When a student drops a course during the first two weeks of classes, the Registrar does not place the course on the student's record. When a student drops a course after the second week, the Registrar places the course on the student's record with a "W" (for withdrawal). After the second week of classes, adjustments to a student's schedule must be filed with the Registrar. 

To drop more than one course during the third through the ninth week, simultaneously or cumulatively, requires the dean's signature as well as the advisor's. No student is permitted to drop a course after the ninth week of classes unless the dean makes an exception. Exceptions are made only for extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control.

Maximum Number of Credits Students May Take Per Semester

To register for more than the maximum credits listed below, the student must obtain permission from the student's advisor and academic dean.
Engineering, Fine Arts, and Pharmacy
19
21
If 5th semester or above and earned 2.6 SGPA or above the previous semester
All other schools and colleges
17
18
If earned 2.6 SGPA or above the previous semester 
or taking National Defense courses

In all schools and colleges, except Engineering, Fine Arts, and Pharmacy, a freshman or sophomore in the Honors Program who has, or will have, earned a minimum of 18 credits at the time of enrollment and has met the minimum excess credit requirement for the University may register for or be enrolled in a maximum of 19 credits. Honors juniors and seniors who have earned a grade point average of at least 3.0 for the last semester for which grades are available, may enroll in up to 21 credits.

For a five or six-week Summer Session, the maximum is 8 credits.
For three-week terms, the maximum is 4 credits.

Consent courses. For consent courses, students must get the required consent(s) before adding the course. (See course descriptions)

Failure to Register. Students must enroll in a course to attend the class. Instructors with unenrolled students in a class should tell the students they should add the course to attend, then notify the Registrar. Unenrolled students will earn no credit for courses or parts of courses completed. Students who have paid their fees may register late with the permission of the student's advisor, instructors, department heads of the departments offering the courses and the student's academic dean.

Improper Registration. Students who discover they are not eligible for a course in which they have enrolled, should consult their advisor and drop the course as soon as possible. Upon recommendation of an advisor, instructor, department head or dean, the Registrar may remove students from courses for which students are not eligible to enroll.

Auditing Courses Without Credit. Students wanting to have the fact that they were exposed to the material in a course recorded on their academic record, but not receive either credit or a grade, may choose to audit a course. The student may participate in the course as the instructor permits. In place of a grade, the record will show AUD.

All students planning to audit a course must get an Audit Card from the Registrar, complete it, and file it with the Registrar. To complete the card, they must consult their advisor and get the instructor's consent. Students changing a course from credit to audit after the second week of classes receive both W (for Withdrawal) and AUD marks on their academic records. The instructor may disenroll a student not meeting the auditing criteria set forth by the instructor.

Part-time students must pay the same fee to audit a course as they would pay if they took the course for credit.

Repeating Courses.  Any student who is regularly registered for courses and who satisfies the requirements shall receive credit except that no student shall receive credit for the same course twice, unless it is specifically so stated as in a variable content course. Courses with the same number that cover the same course content cannot be counted more than once for credit. The parenthetical phrases (Formerly offered as...) and (Also offered as...) that follow a course title as a cross reference indicate that a student may not take both the course and the cross-referenced course. A student is regularly registered for a course only if he or she has conformed to all university or college regulations or requirements applying to registration for the course.

A student may repeat a course previously taken one time without seeking permission in order to earn a higher grade. The student may take the course a third time with the permission of the dean of the school or college in which the student is enrolled and the instructor of the course. Under no circumstances may a student take a course more than three times.

When a student repeats a course, credit shall be allowed only once. Furthermore, in the computation of the grade point average, the registered credit and grade points for the most recent taking of the course shall be included in the GPA calculation and the registered credit and grade for the prior taking of the course shall remain on the transcript, but shall be removed from the GPA calculation.

The student should note that repeating a course that was previously passed can have negative consequences. For example, if a student fails a class previously passed, the student would lose credit for the first, passed, attempt and not earn credit for the second, failed, attempt. Repeating a previously passed course may also have an effect on financial aid. Students considering repeating previously passed courses should consult their advisors and Student Financial Aid Services staff.

When a student repeats a course after receiving a degree, the student's transcript will indicate a grade, but no registered credit, for the repeated course. The grade and registered credit recorded for the course prior to receipt of the degree shall continue to be included in the GPA and credit calculations.

A student must have department head permission to repeat a course that is listed as a prerequisite or corequisite for any course that the student has passed. For example, a student who received a D in Chemistry 1127Q and subsequently passed Chemistry 1128Q may not retake Chemistry 1127Q without permission.

Independent Study, Special Topics and Variable Topics Courses. Students wishing to study a subject independently, for credit, must find an instructor to supervise the project. The instructor and the student then agree on the number of credits the student may earn. The student must complete an Independent Study Authorization Form, have it signed, and deliver it to the Registrar. Without special permission, students may not register for or earn toward the degree more than six credits each semester in any one or combination of independent study, special topics, and variable topics courses. To increase this limit, students must consult with their advisor and get the permission of their academic dean.

Registration in Courses Labeled "Credits and Hours by Arrangement". The student and the instructor agree on the number of credits the student expects to earn and the student enters the number of credits when registering. If the number of credits a student expects to earn changes during the semester, the instructor must report the change to the Office of the Registrar as soon as possible, by memo, class list or grade sheet.

Denial of Space for Non-Attendance. Instructors may deny an enrolled student a place in a classroom when the student attends no class nor laboratory during the first two weeks of the semester. When the instructor denies a student a place in the classroom, the student is still enrolled in the course. Students who continue to absent themselves from class without dropping or withdrawing from the course risk failing the course.

Grading

Explanation
Final Grades
Grade Points
Course Credit
Skill
Excellent
A
A-
4.0
3.7
yes
yes
yes
yes
Very Good
B+
3.3
yes
yes
Good
B
B-
C+
3.0
2.7
2.3
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Average
C
2.0
yes
yes
Fair
C-
1.7
yes
yes
Poor
D+
D
1.3
1.0
yes
yes
yes
yes
Merely Passing
D-
0.7
yes
yes
Failure
F
0.0
no
no
Pass/Fail Pass
P@
na
yes
no
Pass/Fail Failure
F@
na
no
no
Satisfactory
S
na
yes
no
Unsatisfactory
U
na
no
no
Audit
Aud
na
no
no
Withdrawal
W
na
no
no
Continuing Registration
na
na
na
na
Undergraduate Marks: Relation of marks, points, course credits and fulfillment of skill requirements. 

Grade Point Formulas. Grade points for courses graded A-F are the product of the course credits and the points per credit for the grade earned. For example, given a B- for a 3-credit course, points earned for the course are 8.1 (2.7 x 3). For any period, the total grade points for the courses graded A-F divided by the total credits give the grade point average. The term GPA includes all courses graded A-F in a semester or summer session. The cumulative GPA averages all courses graded A-F.

If a student repeats a course that may not be repeated for credit, the Registrar records the grades for both attempts. If the repeat occurred prior to Summer Session 2002, both attempts are included in the GPA calculations. If the repeat occurs after Spring 2002, only the second attempt is included in the GPA calculations although both grades appear on the transcript. The student should note that when a lower grade is earned on the second attempt, that lower grade is the one that is used in the calculations.

Students withdrawing from a full-year course at the close of the first semester will, if they have passed the first part of the course, receive credit for the work of the first semester, unless the course description states otherwise.

Temporary Marks of I and X. An I or X means the student has not earned course credit at the end of the semester and may be subject to scholastic probation or dismissal.

I (incomplete): The instructor reports an I if the completed work is passing and the instructor decides that, due to unusual circumstances, the student cannot complete the course assignments. If the student completes the work by the end of the third week of the next semester, the instructor will send the Registrar a grade for the course. Otherwise, the Registrar will convert the I to I F. Effective with spring 2004 classes, upon successful completion of a course, the I on the academic record is replaced by the permanent letter grade. If the instructor does not submit a grade the Registrar will change the grade to IF or I U.

X (absent from the final examination): The instructor reports an X only when a student missed the final examination and when passing it with a high mark could have given the student a passing grade for the course. If the student would have failed the course regardless of the grade on the final examination, the student will receive an F. If the instructor reports an X and the Office of Student Services and Advocacy excuses the absence, the instructor will give the student another opportunity to take the examination. The absence must be due to sickness or other unavoidable causes. The instructor must give the examination before the end of the third week of the next semester. If by the end of the third week of the next, registered semester the instructor does not send a grade to the Registrar, the Registrar will change the X to X F or X U.

In exceptional instances, after consulting the instructor, the Director of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy may extend the time for completing courses marked I or X.

Other Temporary Marks. The letters N, and Y are temporary marks posted on a student's academic record when the instructor has not reported a final grade.

N: recorded when no grade is reported for a student who has been registered in a course section; usually indicates a registration problem.

Y: recorded when course does not end at conclusion of semester or summer session. This mark may be assigned only to courses the Senate Curricula and Courses Committee specifically approves. It is not intended as an alternative to the I or X.

N, X, and Y temporary marks are replaced on the academic record by the actual grade when submitted by the instructor. An N mark which remains unresolved will become NF and be computed as an F at the end of the third week of the next semester of registration. If no grade is submitted for a mark of X, the mark will automatically revert to a grade of F or U and will be shown as X F or XU.

Temporary marks I, X, N, Y do not prevent the calculation of either the semester or the cumulative grade point average.

Temporary marks I, X, and N do not represent earned credit. A student placed on probation with unresolved grades will be relieved of probation status if satisfactory completion of the work places his or her academic performance above the probation standards. See section on Scholastic Standards.

S and U. In a few courses, with the permission of the Senate Curricula and Courses Committee, the instructor grades everyone in the course either S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). As these grades have no grade points they do not affect grade-point averages. Courses graded S/U may not be used to satisfy the General Education Requirements.

Pass/Fail Option. The University Senate, the schools, the colleges and some programs have restricted the credits placed on Pass/Fail in various ways. Thus students planning to place a course on Pass/Fail should consider the consequences carefully. The advantage to the student is that the grade for a course placed on Pass/Fail does not affect their grade point average. However, they should discuss with their advisor the immediate, the long-term, the direct, and the indirect effects.

Students who have earned at least 24 credits and are not on scholastic probation may place three courses, for no more than 12 credits, on Pass/Fail. Students may not place more than one course each semester on Pass/Fail, nor more than one during the summer, regardless of the number of summer sessions attended.

Students place courses on Pass/Fail, or remove them from Pass/Fail, at the Office of the Registrar. The examining, grading and reporting do not differ from that of other students. The Registrar enters P@ if the instructor submits a passing grade and F@ if the student fails. Students must place courses on Pass/Fail during the first two weeks of the semester or the first week of the summer session. If a student, having placed a course on Pass/Fail, decides to remove it from Pass/Fail, the student must do so by the ninth week of the semester or the fourth week of summer session.

Restrictions on Pass/Fail Courses. Courses placed on Pass/Fail do not satisfy the General Education Requirement, the major or related requirements, the skill requirements, the minor requirements, or any school or college course requirement. Pass/Fail credits may not be acceptable when a student changes majors or schools within the University. Pass/Fail credits may not be transferable to another institution.

Non-degree students must have the approval of the Director of the Center for Continuing Studies to place a course on Pass/Fail. The Director grants permission only in extenuating circumstances.

Students working on a degree at another institution need written approval from their dean, or other official, at the other institution to place a course on Pass/Fail.

The Registrar does not place a student on the Dean's List if the instructor's grade for a Pass/Fail course is less than C. Note that at least 12 credits must contribute to the semester grade point average placing a student on the Dean's List. As the Pass/Fail marks have no grade points, the instructor's grade does not contribute to the grade point averages. Note also that at least 54 credits must contribute to the grade-point average for students to graduate cum laude or higher.

Restriction by School or College. Listed below are the Pass/Fail supplementary restrictions imposed by each school and college.

  1. In the School of Business, students may not elect the Pass/Fail option for any of the departments of the School.
  2. In the School of Education, students may not elect the Pass/Fail option for courses offered in the School of Education which are required for certification as a teacher.
  3. In the School of Engineering, no course taken on Pass/Fail may be counted for credit toward graduation.
  4. In the School of Pharmacy, no specifically required courses (all courses for which no alternate choice is given in the curricular listings) can be taken on Pass/Fail.
  5. In the Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture students may only place one course on the Pass/Fail option.

Class Attendance. The instructor describes the computation of the grades and the relation between grades and attendance at the beginning of the semester. Where grades depend on classroom participation, absences may affect the student's grade. However, if a student were absent and the instructor reduced the grade, the reduction would be due to lack of class participation, not the student's absence. Except for final examinations, instructors have final authority in permitting students to submit assignments late or make up examinations.

Final Examinations. Without special permission from the dean, the instructors of Undergraduate courses must give a written examination at the end of the semester. Independent study courses, seminars, practicums, laboratory and similar courses do not require final examinations if the instructor had approval from the dean before the semester began. Instructors may give seniors oral final examinations. Instructors of courses numbered 5000 and above give written final examinations at their discretion.

Instructors determine the weight assigned to the final examination in computing the final grade.

Final Examinations for Courses Given at Non-standard Times. In undergraduate courses scheduled by arrangement or at non-standard times, final examinations must be given during the same scheduled week as courses scheduled at standard times. Instructors of graduate courses scheduled by arrangement may schedule the final examination during the final examination period, provided (1) space is available, (2) no student will have a conflict and (3) no student has more than two examinations in one day.

Absences from Final Examinations. If, due to extenuating circumstances, a student cannot take a final examination as announced in the Final Examination Schedule, the student must ask permission from the Office of Student Services and Advocacy to reschedule the examination. When the student has permission to reschedule, the instructor will schedule it at a time agreeable to both. A student whose absence from a final examination is not excused in this way shall receive no credit for this examination. A student whose absence is excused by the Director of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy shall have an opportunity to take an examination without penalty. (See X under Grading System.)

Rescheduling Final Examinations. Students should check their final examination schedule to see if they have either:

(a) four examinations in two consecutive calendar days,

(b) three examinations in one calendar day, or

(c)three examinations in consecutive time-blocks spanning parts of two consecutive days.

If any of the above apply, they may request the Office of Student Services and Advocacy to rearrange their schedule. The Office of Student Services and Advocacy will select one of the examinations for rescheduling and notify the instructor, usually with a letter given to the student.

Grade Reports. Instructors of 1000 and 2000-level courses notify the Registrar by the end of the sixth week of the semester of students who appear to be in danger of earning D, F, U or N grades. The Registrar alerts the students, their advisors, and others, such as the First Year Programs Office, as  appropriate, via the University's e-mail system. These reports are not part of the permanent record. They are designed to be of diagnostic aid to the student. If a student is doing unsatisfactory work, the full responsibility for improvement is left to the student. The student is strongly advised, however, to confer with his or her advisor, with the instructors concerned, and with others qualified to assist him or her in improving his or her standing in the University.
At the end of each semester, students may view their grades on the Student Administration System at https://student.studentadmin.uconn.edu.

Changes of Course Grades. Grades are part of the student's permanent record. Therefore they are not changed for reasons unrelated to course requirements or quality of work. An instructor may neither accept additional work nor give additional examinations once the grade in the course has been submitted. Nevertheless, there can be situations in which course grades may and ought to be changed. These comprise computational errors, clerical errors, and the discovery of overlooked components in a student's body of work. In cases when the instructor of record concludes that a course grade ought to be changed, he or she determines a corrected grade and initiates the grade change process. The grade change must be approved by the head of the department offering the course (in departmentalized schools or colleges) and the dean of the school or college in which the course is taught in order to monitor grade changes and ensure that they are based only on the considerations mentioned above. If a grade change is approved, the dean will notify the instructor, student, and Registrar in writing.

Appeals of Assigned Course Grades. A student who believes that an error in grading has occurred and wishes to request a review by the instructor of record must do so within six months of the course grade having been posted. If the instructor of record cannot be contacted, the student should contact the Department Head. If the instructor agrees that a change is justified, the instructor will initiate the grade change according to the procedure described above. Individual schools and colleges may have more stringent requirements.

If a student requests a review of a course grade and the instructor believes that the original grade is correct, the student may appeal the decision to the head of the department in which the course is taught within 30 days. The department head will seek input from the instructor and the student. If this process results in agreement by the instructor that a grade change is justified, the instructor will initiate the grade change. If the instructor and the department head agree that a grade change is not justified, the department head shall notify the student in writing with a copy to the instructor.

If the student is dissatisfied with the appeal decision, the student may request, within 10 days, through the dean of the school or college in which the course is taught, a review by the Faculty Grade Change Review Panel. If the department head thinks that a grade change is justified but the instructor does not agree, the department head shall request, through the dean of the school or college in which the course is taught, a review by a Faculty Grade Change Review Panel.

The Faculty Grade Change Review Panel is composed of three full-time faculty members appointed by the dean of the school or college in which the course is taught. The panel convenes a hearing within 10 working days of notification of a case. Both the appealing student and the course instructor should be present at the hearing. The student is afforded an opportunity to state the grounds on which he or she is appealing the grade. The instructor is afforded the opportunity to document the basis on which the grade was awarded. Both parties may present supporting evidence and/or request testimony of others. The panel may also request input from the department head. The Review panel will send a written report of the decision to the instructor, the student, the department head, and the dean of the school or college offering the course. If the panel recommends a grade change, it sends the Registrar a change of grade request signed by all the members of the Review Panel. The decision of the Faculty Review Panel shall be considered final.

Scholastic Standards

Traditional Semester Standing Earned Credits
Freshman
1
2
0 - 11
12 - 23
Sophomore
3
4
24 - 39
40 - 53
Junior
5
6
54 - 69
70 - 85
Senior
7
8
9
10
86 - 99
100+
117 - 133 (Pharmacy)
134+ (Pharmacy)

 

Undergraduate Earned Credit Semester Standing

The University of Connecticut charts a student's educational progress by semester standing based on earned credits rather than the traditional designations of freshman, sophomore, junior, senior.  However, semester standing may be related to these traditional terms as indicated in the chart above.

Standing is based on earned credits, not on numbers of semesters attended.  Courses in progress are not counted.  Standing is advanced after minimum credits indicated below have been earned.

The Dean's List. At the end of each semester the Dean of each school and college names to the Dean's List those students who (1) were registered for at least 12 credits calculable for grade points, (2) received no grade below C, including the actual letter grade awarded in any course under the Pass/Fail option, (3) earned at least 3.0 times as many grade points as the number of calculable credits recorded by the Registrar, and (4) were in at least the upper quartile of their school or college.

Undergraduate students whose disabilities warrant the adjustment of carrying fewer than a full-time course load per semester can be determined eligible for Dean's List status. The Center for Students with Disabilities will notify the Registrar each semester regarding students who are eligible.

Annually, at the conclusion of the Spring semester, the deans of the various schools and colleges shall issue a list of those degree-seeking students who did not attain full-time status at any time during the previous 12 months, but who, during this 12 month period (including summer and intersession sessions) (a) were registered for a total of at least twelve calculable credits, (b) received no mark below C nor received a U in any course, (c) earned at least a 3.0 grade point average, and (d) were in the upper quartile of their respective school or college based on the Spring data. These students will receive the distinction: “Dean’s List (Part-time)”.

Scholastic Probation. Scholastic probation is an identification of students whose scholastic performance is below University standards. The student and the student's counselor are informed that a marked academic improvement in future semesters is necessary to obtain the minimum scholastic standards.

Students are on scholastic probation for the next semester in which they are enrolled if their academic performance is such that they are included in any of the following conditions:

1. Students who have earned 0-11 credits (considered to be first semester standing) and who have earned less than a 1.8 semester grade point average.

2. Students who have earned 12-23 credits (considered to be second semester standing) and who have earned less than a 1.8 semester grade point average.

3. Students who have earned 24 credits or more (considered to be third semester or higher) and who have earned less than a 2.0 semester grade  point average or cumulative grade point average.

The end of the semester is defined as the day when semester grades must be submitted to the Registrar. This must occur no later than seventy-two hours after the final examination period ends.

Incomplete and Absent grades (I, X, and N) do not represent earned credit. A student placed on probation with unresolved grades will be relieved of probation status if satisfactory completion of the work places his or her academic performance above the probation standards.

Any student placed on academic probation because of a cumulative grade point average less than 2.0 shall be removed from probation when the cumulative grade point average reaches 2.0 or above.

Warning letters will be sent to students in good standing who have completed their first or second semster with less than a 2.0 semester grade point average.

Dismissal. A student who fails to meet these minimum scholastic standards for two consecutively registered semesters is subject to dismissal. However, no student with at least a 2.3 semester grade point average after completing all courses for which he or she is registered at the end of a semester shall be subject to dismissal; the student will be continued on scholastic probation if such status is warranted.

Students who are subject to dismissal but who, for extraordinary reasons, are permitted to continue may be subjected by the Office for Undergraduate Education to other conditions for their continuance.

When a student is dismissed from the University for scholastic reasons only, any certificate or transcript issued must contain the statement "Dismissed for scholastic deficiency but otherwise entitled to honorable dismissal."

Dismissal involves non-residence on the University campus and loss of status as a candidate for a degree effective immediately upon dismissal.

A student who has been dismissed from the University for academic reasons may not register for courses at the University as a non-degree student without the approval of the Director of Continuing Studies, who will inform the dean of the student's previous school or college about the decision made.

Students who have been dismissed may, during a later semester, request an evaluation for readmission to the University by applying to the Dean of the school or college into which entry is sought. Readmission will be considered favorably only when the evaluation indicates a strong probability for academic success. In their first regular semester after readmission, dismissed students will be on scholastic probation and may be subjected by the Office for Undergraduate Education to other conditions for their continuance. Students who have left the University for a reason other than academic dismissal are readmitted under the same scholastic standing status as achieved at the time of separation from the University.

Supplementary Scholastic Standards. In addition to the minimum scholastic standards described above and applicable to all University students several of the schools have supplementary requirements as follows:

1. The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Department of Allied Health Sciences requires a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.2 in order to gain admission to the professional majors. Thereafter, students must maintain the following standards of scholastic achievement to continue in the professional major. Students who fail to maintain the minimum grade point averages or minimum course standard in any of these areas are subject to dismissal from the professional program and in some cases the Department of Allied Health Sciences. Students must maintain a minimum semester grade point average of a 2.2. Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of a 2.2. Students must maintain a minimum major grade point average of a 2.2.

The Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Major GPA includes all courses offered with the following departmental designations:  AH; DGS; and MCB 2410, MCB 2210 and MCB 2610.

The Dietetics Major GPA includes all courses offered with the following departmental designations:  AH;  DIET; and: NUSC 2200, 3233, 3234 and 3235.
The Medical Technology Major GPA includes all courses offered with the following departmental designations: Allied Health; and Medical Technology.

Students must obtain a “C” or better in all courses required for graduation that are in the Department of Allied Health Sciences. Courses vary with program. No student may take a course in the Department of Allied Health Sciences for which another course in the Department is a prerequisite unless that student has earned a grade of “C” or better in that prerequisite course. No course in the Department of Allied Health Sciences may be repeated more than once (for a total of two times).

All students choosing the Landscape Architecture Major in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources will be evaluated after they have taken introductory landscape architecture courses LAND 2110 and 2210. Minimum requirements for continuance in the Program of Landscape Architecture are a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better and a grade of 3.0 (B) or better in both introductory courses. For students meeting these requirements, faculty evaluation of portfolio of work produced in introductory courses, student essay and GPA will determine final acceptance into the Program.

Thereafter students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better, and must earn grades of 2.7 (B-) or better for all major (LAND) courses. Students who receive more than one grade below 2.7 (B-) in major (LAND) courses will be dismissed from the major. Courses may be retaken if space allows, with permission of the instructor, but no course in the Program of Landscape Architecture may be repeated more than once (for a total of two times).

2.    Students admitted to the School of Business must earn a 2.79 cumulative grade point average by the end of the term in which they earn a minimum of 24 calculable credits of graded coursework at the University of Connecticut and a 2.93 cumulative grade point average by the end of the following fulltime equivalent term to be guaranteed continuation in the School. Students must also earn a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in all freshman through sophomore year courses in order to be guaranteed continuation to the junior year in the School of Business. Normally the 3.0 cumulative grade point average review will take place at the end of a student's fourth term/when a student has completed 60 credits. Students who have not maintained an average of 15 credits per term may be reviewed after earning 54 credits, just prior to when they are eligible to take 3000-4000 level courses.  Additionally, students must show substantial progress toward meeting the freshman-sophomore course requirements, especially those courses that are requisites for the 3000/4000 level business courses (ENGL 1010 or 1011, ACCT 2001, MATH 1070Q and 1071Q, ECON 1201 and 1202, or 1200, STAT 1000 or 1100) and must successfully complete these courses by the end of their 4th term (60 credits) . Transfer students are reviewed under the above standards based on total credit standing, including transfer credits. However non University of Connecticut grades are not considered when computing the GPA so transfer students may be reviewed with fewer than 24 credits taken at the University of Connecticut. All course grades, including all grades of repeated courses, are considered in the above grade point average calculations.

Students accepted to the School of Business must maintain a minimum at least a 2.0 in their term grade point average, their cumulative grade point average and all School of Business courses numbered 2000-level and above. The GPA calculation will include all courses and grades for which the students have been registered including all grades of repeated courses and Business courses taken on pass/fail. Students who fail to maintain the minimum grade point average in any of these areas or fail to complete specified courses as noted above are subject to dismissal from the School of Business. Students conditionally admitted to the School on the basis of successful completion of courses for which they have indicated they were registered must pass all those courses by the end of that term and meet the 2.0 grade point average for the semester, cumulative, and business courses or be subject to having their acceptance rescinded.

3. The School of Engineering requires a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in all courses in Mathematics, sciences and Engineering applicable toward the degree in order for a student to be admitted to the junior year in his/her selected major.

4. Fine Arts students (with the exception of Art History and Theatre Studies majors) must enroll in a minimum of six credits in major department courses (Art and Art History, Dramatic Arts, or Music) each semester of full-time study unless an exception is granted by the Director of Advising of the school. Students who fail to comply with the minimum credit requirement are subject to dismissal from the school.

5. A student in the School of Nursing must have a grade of C or better in the following courses : BIOL 1107; CHEM 1122; MCB 2400 or 2410; PNB 2264, 2265; MATH 1020Q, 1030Q, 1040Q, or 1060Q; STAT 1000Q or 1100Q; PSYC 1100; SOCI 1001 or ANTH 1000 or ANTH 1006; HDFS 1070; PHIL 1101-1106; NURS 1110, 1130, 3100, 3110, 3120, 3130. Students admitted to the School of Nursing must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 at the end of the semester in which they have completed 26 calculable credits of graded coursework at the University of Connecticut. In order to progress in the 3000-level nursing courses, students must complete all prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better. In order to progress, a cumulative GPA of 2.7 is required prior to enrollment in NURS 3220, 3230, or 3292. Students lacking a 2.7 total grade point average at this point in the program will be dismissed from the School of Nursing.

Students must earn a C (2.0) or better in all nursing courses (those with NURS designation) in order to earn credit toward graduation. No student may take a course in the nursing curriculum without having completed prerequisite courses with a grade of C or higher. No courses required for graduation as a nursing major may be taken more than twice before achieving a passing grade. Students may be dismissed if there is more than one semester in which they earn a semester grade point average below 2.5 in required nursing courses. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above in all required nursing courses is required for graduation.

Students are permitted to repeat only one required nursing course once throughout their nursing education and remain in the School of Nursing when all other standards are met.

6. Admission to the School of Pharmacy professional program is competitive, with strong emphasis on the cumulative grade point average in BIOL 1107, MCB 2000 and 2610; CHEM 1127Q, 1128Q, 2443 and 2444; MATH 1131, PHYS 1300, PHAR 2002 and PHAR 2003 or their equivalent. Once in Pharmacy School, students are subject to dismissal if there is more than one semester in which they earn a semester grade point average (GPA), a cumulative GPA or a Pharmacy GPA below 2.0. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in all required Pharmacy courses is required to enroll in clinical clerkships/rotations; a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required for graduation. Student must receive a grade of 2.0 or above in PHRM 3008 and PHRM 5009 or PHRX 5047 to continue into the clinical experience sequence. For any grade less than a C- in a required pharmacy course, one occurrence at any time in pharmacy school would result in probation and intervention by the Associate Dean. Two occurrences at any time in pharmacy school would result in review by the Academic and Technical Standards Review Committee with recommendations for appropriate action to the Associate Dean. Three occurrences at any time in pharmacy school would result in a recommendation for dismissal by this committee to the Associate Dean.

7. Students in the Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture are eligible for dismissal if their first semester grade point average is less than 1.2.

Cancellation and Withdrawal. Students may voluntarily leave the University through one of two possible actions - cancellation of registration or withdrawal. Both actions are finalized in the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. A personal interview with a staff member in the Office of Student Services and Advocacy, would be appropriate for any student considering voluntary separation. The interview may help the student realize alternatives and/or options which would allow the student to continue at the University. If a personal interview is not desired, or not possible, written notice must be given to the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. No student is considered officially separated and no refunds of fees or deposits can be made unless the student has contacted (interview or letter) the Office of Student Services and Advocacy.

Cancellation: Students presently enrolled may cancel their registration for the subsequent semester, while planning to complete the current one. Students may also cancel their registration during the summer and midyear vacations if they do not intend to return for the following semester. Cancellations must take place prior to the first day of classes of a semester. The date of cancellation will not appear on the student's official transcript.

Withdrawal: To withdraw officially means to voluntarily terminate enrollment during a semester which is in progress. Students may withdraw between the first day of classes and the last day before final examinations officially begin. (See the University Calendar for dates.) Students who officially withdraw will not receive credits, or "F's" or "W's" for courses taken during the semester. Only the date of withdrawal will be entered on the student's official transcript. Students who merely leave the University or stop attending classes, without officially withdrawing, should expect to receive Fail "F" grades in all courses in which they are registered at the close of the semester other than those for which grades have previously been submitted.

No student who withdraws after the end of the sixth week of a semester will be permitted to register for a subsequent semester without the permission of the Director of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. It is understood that when such permission is sought the Director will ascertain the standing of the student at the time when he or she withdrew. For purposes of application for readmission such students shall be treated as a dismissed student if his or her standing at the time of withdrawal is such that if it were continued to the end of the semester he or she would then be subject to dismissal.

A student in good standing who leaves the University at the end of a semester and is out of residence for one or more semesters may re-enter at the beginning of any later semester upon application to the Director of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. The attention of such students is called to the fact that special permission is needed to count courses taken more than eight years before graduation.

All students withdrawing from the University for any reason must complete the proper forms through the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. If the withdrawing student lives on campus s/he must also complete the proper forms through the Residential Life Office.

Leave of Absence. A leave of absence is a special status assigned to students who have been granted permission by the Office of Student Services and Advocacy to interrupt their studies and resume them in a subsequent semester specified by mutual agreement. A leave of absence is granted in conjunction with a Voluntary Separation (usually a cancellation). Leaves are not granted for more than three full semesters or to students who wish to interrupt their studies for less than one full semester.

Requests for leaves are considered only after the student has personally consulted a representative of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy and frequently a representative of the student’s school or college. Leaves are granted only to students in good academic standing, who know the specific semester in which they plan to return. Students on academic probation or who have outstanding incomplete work are seldom granted a leave of absence.

Readmission. A student seeking readmission to the University must apply to the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. Applications for readmission are accepted beginning February 15th and ending on July 1st for the fall semester, and beginning September 15th and ending on December 1st for the spring semester. The attention of such students is called to the following University regulations: (1) A student who wishes to apply toward a degree credits earned more than eight years before graduation must obtain permission from the dean of the school or college concerned and the Office for Undergraduate Education: (2) All readmitted students (except those who are on an official leave of absence returning to their previous school or college) must satisfy the academic requirements of the school or college to which readmitted as stated in the catalog effective at the time of readmission, unless a subsequent catalog is elected.

Disciplinary Suspension or expulsion. Disciplinary suspension or expulsion may be incurred as a result of unsatisfactory conduct.  Students who are suspended or expelled are not entitled to any refund of University fees including room and board fees.

University Suspension. Separation from the University for a designated period of time after which the student shall be eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified. A student who is on suspension is prohibited from participating in any University activity or program. The student may not enter University premises or University-related premises without securing prior approval from the Director of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy. A notation of “Suspension” shall be placed on the student’s official transcript until graduation. However, the student may petition the Director of the Office of Student Services and Advocacy for earlier removal of the notation. The University of Connecticut will not accept credits earned at another institution during a period of suspension.

University Expulsion. Permanent separation from the University. A student who has been expelled is prohibited from participating in any University activity or program or from entering University premises or University-related premises. A permanent notation of "Expulsion" shall be placed on the student's transcript.

For complete rules, regulations and procedure consult Responsibilities of Community Life: The Student Code.

Change of School. Students wishing to change from one school or college to another should consult their advisor and the dean of the school or college the student wishes to enter. Students may get a School Change Petition from the office of a dean or from the Office of the Registrar. The applicant should give the completed Petition to the dean of the school or college the applicant wishes to enter.

Students who transfer out of a school or college may no longer continue under the requirements of that school or college. If they transfer back into that school or college they may no longer continue under earlier requirements. When students change schools their catalog year for the second school is the year of the change, unless the dean of the school to which they transfer makes an exception.

Change of Major within a School or College. All students wanting to change majors should consult their academic dean, or for, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students, the CLAS Academic Services Center.

Change of Campus. Most University programs require completion of 54 earned credits in order to change from a regional campus to the Storrs campus. A complete listing of campus change requirements can be found on the Office of the Registrar web site at http://www.registrar.uconn.edu/campuschange.htm. Rare exceptions to the campus change requirements are made for extenuating circumstances only and require approval from the Student Affairs Office at the student's regional campus. Storrs students who wish to change to a regional campus should contact the Office of the Registrar.

Transfer Credits for Continuing Students. Students who wish to take courses elsewhere and apply the credits toward their degrees should consult their advisor, their academic dean and the Transfer Admissions Office beforehand. Otherwise, the credits may not apply toward the student's degree. The student must obtain a Transfer Course Approval form from the Transfer Admissions Office and submit an official transcript of the work as soon as it is completed. Ordinarily, the student must complete the last two semesters at the University of Connecticut. (See Residence Requirement.)

Transfer courses must have a grade of "C" (2.0 on 4.0 scale) or above in order to transfer. Grades and grade points do not transfer. If the student earns grades of "P," "CR," or the like, for work completed elsewhere, the student must provide the Transfer Admissions Office with official letter grade equivalents to have the work evaluated.

Honors Scholar Program

The Honors Scholar Program provides a nationally-competitive program for academically-superior and highly-motivated students. It enriches the academic experience of undergraduates in all majors by offering the challenges of more in-depth study and considerable opportunity for independent projects or research. Participation in the Honors Program further influences the quality and character of a student's education by offering opportunities for involvement in a community designed for individual, social, and cultural development.

During their first two years, Honors Scholars choose from a variety of special Honors sections of courses offered to satisfy UConn’s General Education requirements and/or to build strong foundations in their academic disciplines. Students also enroll in specially-designed Honors First-year Seminars and interdisciplinary Honors Core Curriculum courses. Sophomore Honors is awarded after the second year and upon the fulfillment of Honors credit, activity, and grade point average requirements. During the junior and senior years, students emphasize work in the major, with Honors credit for course work generally attained by independent Honors projects associated with courses at the 2000-level or above, Honors seminars in the major, graduate-level course work, and/or independent research.

An active living-learning environment is fostered through the First-year Honors Residential Community, Honors residence options for upper-class students, and the student-run Honors Council. Honors Scholars are encouraged to participate in social and community service activities, seminars with visiting scholars, artists, and persons in public life, and many activities offered through the other undergraduate enrichment programs; the Individualized and Interdisciplinary Studies Program, the Office of National Scholarships, the Office of Study Abroad, the Office of Undergraduate Research. The Honors Program sponsors several study abroad experiences, including programs in Washington, DC and Cape Town, South Africa.

All students enrolled in the Honors Program are assigned specially-trained Honors advisors who assist students with course selection. Once students have selected a major, they are assigned a faculty Honors advisor who provides support with long-range academic planning. Students enrolled in the Honors Program receive priority registration, special library privileges, and relief from maximum credit restrictions. Participation in the Honors Program is recorded on the student’s transcript each semester. Students who graduate as Honors Scholars receive an Honors notation on the diploma and transcript. They are recognized in the Commencement program and at the Honors Medals Ceremony, where they receive an Honors medal to wear during commencement.

Qualified entering first-year students at the Storrs campus are admitted to the Honors Program by invitation only. Candidates are expected to have superior academic ability as demonstrated by a rigorous high school curriculum, excellent scores on the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test and evidence of leadership and engagement beyond the classroom. First-year students are notified of their admission to the Honors Program in their letter of admission to the University. Students admitted to the Honors Program as incoming first-year students are often awarded merit-based University scholarships.

Current first and second-year students with excellent academic records may apply for the Honors Program and are admitted based on their credentials and the availability of space in the Program. Students entering their junior years (fifth year for Pharm.D. students) who have excellent academic records, along with the nomination of their major programs, are also invited to join. Entering sophomore transfer students with excellent academic records may apply for admission. Entering junior transfer students with excellent academic records and the nomination of their major programs may also apply.

Honors students are expected to participate fully in Honors Program courses and activities. Academic and participation records are reviewed annually for compliance with Program policies. A student’s continuation as an Honors student for the junior and senior year is subject to the review and approval of the major department. To graduate as Honors Scholars, students must earn a cumulative GPA of at least 3.4, complete at least twelve approved Honors credits, including at least three credits toward the Honors thesis, in their major or related areas at the 2000-level or above, and submit a departmentally-approved Honors thesis to the Honors Program office.

Beyond the minimum University-wide requirements, departments may add further or specific major requirements that must be met in order for students to graduate with the designation of Honors Scholar. These requirements often involve certain prescribed Honors courses and seminars taken in preparation for writing the Honors thesis. Honors Scholars should inquire of the department or program in which they seek Honors about its particular requirements.

Honors at the Regional Campuses

Opportunities for participation in the Honors Program vary across the regional campuses.

• At the Stamford Campus, the Sophomore Honors Certificate program is available to eligible first and second-year students. Students may apply to this program for the second semester of their first year. A version of the junior-senior Honors Program emphasizing independent research in the student’s major and interdisciplinary Honors seminars is also offered.
• Students at the Avery Point campus may apply for admission to the Honors Program as second semester sophomores and engage in junior-senior Honors coursework and thesis research in the majors offered at that campus.
• Students at Greater Hartford, Waterbury and Torrington may apply for entry to the Honors Program as rising juniors, provided that they prepare an acceptable plan of study for earning the necessary Honors credits, secure a faculty member in their major to serve as their thesis advisor, and obtain the endorsement of the department of their major.

University Scholar Program

Each year up to thirty juniors are selected for the University Scholar Program through an application process sponsored by the Honors Program. All undergraduate Honors and non-Honors students from all campuses may apply. This prestigious program allows motivated students to pursue individualized and intellectually-challenging programs of study that include an intensive research or creative project, and a more robust program of coursework to complement the project. Students are usually members of the Program for the last three semesters of undergraduate study. Graduation as a University Scholar is the highest academic honor bestowed on undergraduates by the University of Connecticut.

Students interested in applying to the Program are encouraged to begin planning no later than the second semester of their sophomore year. Program applicants must submit a “letter of intent,” an application form, and appropriate documentation by the published deadlines. Applicants must completely and clearly describe the subject matter, topic, or issue of interest; the proposed University Scholar project, including the methods and resources to be used to complete the project; and the set of courses that would enable them to explore their interests in depth. In late fall, an University Scholars Program committee selects recipients for this award according to the creativity, clarity, detail, and thoughtfulness of the applicants' proposed research projects and programs of study.

A committee composed of a major advisor and two additional advisors enlisted by the student guides the student through his or her study or project. The scholarly work culminates with a tangible product, such as a completed research paper or work of art. Upon completion of the approved University Scholar project and plan of study and the submission of appropriate forms to the Honors Program Office, students earn the title of University Scholar. Students in the University Scholar Program receive awards in the amount charged for the General University Fee every remaining semester the student enrolls in his or her undergraduate program. University Scholars are granted priority registration (graduate student status), priority housing, and special library privileges. University Scholars are also relieved from the maximum credit load during any given semester. Participation in the University Scholar Program is noted on students' academic transcripts at entry and for each semester enrolled. Graduation as a University Scholar is recognized at commencement and on the academic transcript and diploma.

For more information, contact the Honors Program, University of Connecticut, CUE Building, Room 419, Unit 2147, Storrs, CT 06269; (860)-486-4223; or http://www.honors.uconn.edu